Guide to Citing Online Sources

How to format citations for Web sources.
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Updated on: July 12, 2001
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Guide to Citing Internet Resources

Do you ever use the Internet to get information or pictures for your reports? You may not know this, but it's important (not to mention courteous) to cite all your sources.

Intellectual property is property.
Just as people shouldn't go about life taking things from others without asking, you shouldn't take images, sounds and/or words from the online work of others without giving them credit. This quick guide details the various Internet resources and the proper format for citing them.

Basic Format
The basic elements of an Internet citation are as follows:

Author's last name, Author's first name. "Title of Document." Title of complete work (if applicable). Version or file number (if applicable). Document date or date of last revision (if known). Protocol and Internet address, access path, or directories (Date of access).

Specific Examples

World Wide Web

Structure:

Author's Last name, First name. "Title of Document." Page or site name. Document date. Protocol and Internet address (Date of access).

Example:

Frank, Peter. "Yoko Ono As An Artist." The Fluxus Home Page. 1997. http://www.artcommotion.com/Issue2/VisualArts/#Fluxus (1 Aug. 2000).

Online Media

Structure:

Author's Last name, First name. "Title of Image, Sound or Movie." Document date. Title of collection. Protocol and Internet address (Date of download).

Examples:

Images

NASA. "Laika Practicing Her Space Flight." Image from "Laika, the First Dog in Space." http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/space_level2/laika.html (1 August 2000).

Sounds

Saryglar, Alexei. "Sygyt" Music clip from Scientific American article "The Throat Singers of Tuva." http://www.sciam.com/1999/0999issue/IMG/track1.mov (1 August 2000).

Video

United States Government. "Operation Castle." Video footage from PBS Documentary "Race for the Superbomb." http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/bomb/sfeature/cloud.html (2 August 2000).

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