TeacherVision - Lesson Plans, Printables and more Free Trial  Member Benefits  Sign In    
Search:   
We have merged TeacherVision's international content onto one website. Educators around the world can use TeacherVision.com to browse an extensive library of teaching materials. You can still find relevant content for Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States in our Educators' Calendars.  [x] CLOSE
|
 

Predicting: The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear

Grade Levels: K - 2

Objectives

This lesson is designed to introduce predicting as a reading strategy to primary students using the book, The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear by Don and Audrey Wood. In this lesson, students make and refine predictions. This lesson is the first of a set of predicting lessons designed for primary grades.

Predicting is an early primary skill that students should be introduced to early in the year. Students should have some experience making guesses and making predictions about events that are not story-related. As students develop their skills of making predictions, they will learn to modify or change their predictions, based on information from the text.

Materials

  • The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear, by Don and Audrey Wood

  • Sticky notes

  • Graphic Organizer

  • At least one fresh strawberry per student placed in a paper bag

  • One strawberry on a plate

Procedure

  1. Hook/Engagement

    Engage students with this activity before making predictions about the book you will read. Activate prior knowledge and engage students by placing the closed paper bag with the strawberries in a central location. On the chalkboard write the word "prediction". Say, "I wonder what might be in this bag." Guide students as they make a prediction about what might be in the paper bag and upon what information they are basing that prediction. Once you have gathered student responses, open the bag, peer inside, and tell students that the item inside is red. Revise their predictions as needed emphasizing that you have more information to use now. Tear open the paper bag and make final revisions to the predictions emphasizing that the prediction changed based on the information you gathered. State that this process is the same when you read a book. Your predictions change based on the information you gather as you read.

    Ask students what the strawberries might have to do with the story you are going to read. Accept any reasonable answers and if needed provide the information that a strawberry is a sweet tasting fruit that people as well as animals eat.

  2. Vocabulary

    Predicting: Using the pictures, the title, and what you already know to make guesses about a story before, during, and after reading.

  3. Measurable Objectives

    Tell students they will be using a new reading strategy that calls for them to use prior knowledge to make predictions about the text and then read to prove or refine those predictions.

  4. Focused Instruction

    Mark the book with a sticky note at the following stopping points:

    • First stopping point: Cover

    • Second stopping point: Page reading "But, little Mouse, haven't you heard about the big hungry bear?"

    • Third stopping point: Page reading, "BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!"…etc…

    • Fourth stopping point: Page reading, "Quick! There's only one way in the whole wide world… "etc…

    • Fifth stopping point: End of the story

    Model how a good reader makes predictions. Hold up the book The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear by Don and Audrey Wood and show the cover to the class. Use the Think-aloud strategy to model the process of predicting before reading.

    "I found this interesting book at the library and by looking at the cover and reading the title, The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear, I am guessing or predicting the story will be about a mouse, a bear, and a strawberry. Maybe the mouse takes a strawberry from the hungry bear. When we use what we know to make a guess before we read it is called "predicting".

    Read the story aloud to the second stopping point. Think-aloud while reading the book to students, modeling the process of predicting while reading.

    "Hmmm... my prediction that the story would be about a mouse, a bear, and a strawberry was right, but I did not think that the mouse would be picking the strawberry near his house. I'll make a new prediction that the bear comes to the mouse's house to take the strawberry from based on what we read."

    Read the story aloud to the third stopping point. Think-aloud, modeling how to refine predictions and make new predictions while reading.

    "Hmmm... my prediction that the story would be about a mouse, a bear, and a strawberry was right, but I did not think that the mouse would be so scared. I'll make a new prediction that the mouse is too afraid to eat the strawberry and runs away based on what we read."

    Read the story aloud to the fourth stopping point. Think-aloud while reading a book to students, modeling the process of predicting while reading.

    "Hmmm... my prediction that the story would be about a mouse, a bear, and a strawberry was right was right, but I did not think that the person telling the story would want a piece of the strawberry. Do you think I need to change my prediction?"

    Elicit responses from the students about the prediction/s based on what the text is saying and what the pictures are telling them.

    Read aloud to the end of the story. Think-aloud after reading, modeling the process of reflecting on predictions after reading. Cite evidence from the illustrations and text to support your thinking.

    "My first prediction was that the story would be about a mouse, a bear, and a strawberry and that the mouse would take a strawberry from the hungry bear. After reading part of the story I predicted that the mouse was too afraid to eat the strawberry and would run away. Now that I am finished reading I think my predictions were close some of the time because there was a mouse and a strawberry. My predictions were not close because the bear did not come and take the strawberry but the person telling the story got the mouse to give him half of it. Who do you think was telling the story? Maybe it was a bear? Maybe it was a person trying to trick the mouse out of half of the strawberry? What do you think?"
  5. Guided Practice

    Select another book, possibly about mice, to read aloud. Assign three to five students to a group to share their predictions. Hand out the graphic organizer for students to keep track of their predictions. You may want to have other adults volunteer to assist students in writing their predictions.

    Before reading the story aloud, share and discuss predictions as a class and then complete the 'before reading' section of the Prediction Organizer.

    Read the story, stopping at various points to allow groups to revise, verify and make new predictions. Ask a student in each group to share a prediction using the "think-aloud" strategy. Students can take turns writing down the prediction or dictating it to an adult.

    When you finish reading the story aloud allow time for the groups to make final revisions to predictions and complete the 'after reading' section of the Prediction Organizer. Ask a member of each group to "use the "think-aloud" strategy to share their groups' predictions.

    Another suggestion is to use pictures to make a prediction about what may be happening. Cover part of the picture and have students make a prediction, and then uncover the picture and have students revise their predictions. Discuss how having more information can help to make a better prediction.

  6. Independent Practice

    Begin self-selected reading time by having students make a prediction about a book they have chosen. Have students write or draw a picture of the prediction on the Prediction Organizer. Circulate around the room during self-selected reading time asking students about their predictions and whether they need to revise the prediction based upon what they are reading or understanding from the pictures.

  7. Assessment

    Once students have had experience with using prediction as a strategy to improve reading comprehension, you will want to determine their success at using the strategy. Distribute the Prediction Organizer at the beginning of read aloud time, and select a book that students may not be familiar with. Before you read, ask students to write or draw a picture prediction on the Prediction Organizer. During reading, pause to allow students to verify or revise predictions without offering guidance. After reading, ask students to respond to the last section of the Prediction Organizer "Did I predict what happened in the story? Why or why not?"

Reflection and Planning

Collect and review student responses to determine students who are in need of additional instruction. Reflect on how you could enhance the lesson, and determine whether students would benefit from another lesson to reinforce the strategy of predicting. Be sure it is not a student's inability to write that you are assessing, but the student's ability to make predictions about the text.

For more practice with prediciting, try the lesson plans Predicting: Strega Nona and Predicting, DR-TA: The Garden of Abdul Gasazi.

Highlights

Videos
Do your students love videos? We have a growing collection of videos (including related activities) for holidays and events, including: women's history, Memorial Day, Independence Day, slavery & the Civil War, U.S. Presidents, handwashing awareness, the Common Core, American History, and the environment. Enjoy!

June Calendar of Events
June is full events that you can incorporate into your standard curriculum. Our Educators' Calendar outlines activities for each event, including: U.N. World Environment Day (6/5), D-Day (6/6), World Oceans Day (6/8), Diary Day (6/12), Flag Day (6/14), Ramadan Begins (6/18), World Refugee Day (6/20), Father's Day (6/21), Summer Begins (6/21), and Meteor Day (6/30). Plus, celebrate Child Vision Awareness Month and Safety Month all June long!

Teaching with Comics: Galactic Hot Dogs
Reach reluctant readers and English-language learners with comics! Our original teaching guides to the Galactic Hot Dogs comic series (chapters 1-4 and 5-8), as found on Funbrain.com, will take students on a cosmic adventure while engaging their creative minds. Plus, find even more activities for teaching with comics, featuring many other classic stories.

Now available: Galactic Hot Dogs in print! Buy it at bookstores now.

Poptropica Teaching Guides
Poptropica is one of the Internet's most popular sites for kids—and now it's available as an app for the iPad! It's not just a place to play games; each of the islands featured on the site provides a learning opportunity. Check out our teaching guides to four of Poptropica's islands: 24 Carrot Island, Time Tangled Island, Mystery Train Island, and Mythology Island.

Free 7-Day Trial for TeacherVision®

Sign up for a free trial and get access
to our huge library of teaching materials!
Start Trial