|
 

Metaphors and Analogies


Page 1 of 2

What Is It?

Metaphors and analogies are comparisons between unlike things that have some particular things in common. Here are some examples: The human eye is like a camera. Love is a kind of game. Sound waves are like the circular ripples that spread from a stone dropped in water. Metaphors and analogies often begin with such phrases as, "It's just like ...", "It's the same as ...", and "Think of it as ...". Writers use metaphors and analogies to enhance and enliven descriptions, and to express thoughts and ideas more clearly and precisely. You can use the Metaphors and Analogies Graphic Organizer to better explain these concepts to your students.

Why Is It Important?

  1. Good teachers use metaphors and analogies to make new and unfamiliar concepts more meaningful to students by connecting what they already know to what they are learning.

  2. Good readers know how to use analogies and metaphors to get at the meaning of a passage.

  3. When students create their own analogies for new concepts, the analogy can provide a way to assess their understanding of the new concepts.

  4. Metaphors and analogies add "sparkle" to student writing.

Research supports the use of analogies in good teaching:

Recognizing and constructing analogies is one way of helping students bridge the gap between the new and the old. Traditional analogies include the eye and a camera, the heart and a pump, the brain and a computer, and the memory and a file cabinet. Self-created analogies are generally more effective than those made up by others (Gunning, 1996).
The activation of prior knowledge to help students learn new knowledge is considered a basic principle of good teaching (Glynn, 1996) and is the foundation for the effective use of analogies.
Analogies have proven to be effective learning tools for reinforcing thinking skills and conceptual understanding (Alvermann & Phelps, 1998).


 Previous   1   2   Next 


Free 7-Day Trial for TeacherVision®

Sign up for free trial and get our new Black History Month teaching resource pack!

Start Trial

Follow us on:

Follow TeacherVision on Facebook
Follow TeacherVision on Google Plus

Highlights

Classroom Organization Tips
Did you resolve to get organized this year? Our Top 10 Classroom Organization Tips will help you get your classroom in shape for the months ahead, whether your existing system needs a tune-up or you're ready for a total overhaul.

February Calendar of Events
February is full of events that you can incorporate into your standard curriculum. Our Educators' Calendar outlines activities for each event, including: Chinese New Year (2/8), Mardi Gras (2/9), Valentine's Day (2/14), Presidents' Day (2/15), Eating Disorders Awareness Week (2/21-27), and Leap Day (2/29). Plus, celebrate Black History Month, Library Lovers' Month, National Heart Month all February long!

Black History Month
Black History Month (February) is here. Make sure you have the materials to help you teach this important topic, from historical figures (Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks) and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's, to slavery and the Civil War, to racism, discrimination, and the Black Lives Matter movement in America today.

Videos
Interested in using different types of media in your classroom? We have a growing collection of videos, with related activities, for holidays and events, including: slavery & the Civil War, American History, U.S. Presidents, handwashing awareness, the Common Core, women's history, Memorial Day, the American Revolution, and the environment. Enjoy!

Coding & Computer Science
Introduce your students to basic coding and computer science! Our Top 5 Free Coding Tools for Kids, Top 5 Free Coding Tools for Teens, and Hour of Code resources make a great introduction to the computer science skills all students will benefit from.