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World's Tallest Towers

This table lists the name, city, year, and height of the world's tallest towers.
Grades:
3 |
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8

This table provides information about the tallest towers in the world. A tower differs from a building in that the latter has floors, and is designed for residential, business, or manufacturing use. The structures listed here are principally telecommunications towers, and while they may have observation decks or restaurants, they do not have floors all the way up.

Tower, city Year Height
(m)
Height
(ft)
Tokyo Sky Tree
 Tokyo, Japan
20116251,998
Canton Tower,
 Guangzhou, China
20106001,968
CN Tower,
 Toronto, Canada
1976553.31,815
Ostankino Tower,
 Moscow, Russia
1967540.11,772
Oriental Pearl Tower,
 Shanghai, China
19944681,535
Milad Tower,
 Tehran, Iran
20074351,427
Menara Kuala Lumpur,
 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
19944211,381
Tianjin TV Tower,
 Tianjin, China
19914151,362
Central Radio & TV Tower,
 Beijing, China
19924051,329
Kiev TV Tower,
 Kiev, Ukraine
19733851,263
Tashkent Tower,
 Tashkent, Uzbekistan
19853751,230
Liberation Tower,
 Kuwait City, Kuwait
19963721,220
Alma-Ata Tower,
 Almaty, Kazakhstan
19833711,219
Riga TV Tower,
R iga, Latvia
19873681,209
Fernsehturm Tower,
 Berlin, Germany
19693681,207

NOTES: This list includes only towers. Height is from top to bottom, antennas included. Towers and buildings are freestanding structures; this list does not include masts supported by guy wires. The tallest mast currently standing is the KVLY-TV Mast in North Dakota, built in 1963; it is 629 m (2,063 ft) tall. The tallest mast of all time was the Warszawa Radio Mast near Konstantynów, Poland, built in 1974; it was 646 m (2,120 ft) tall before collapsing during renovation work in 1991. (Note that the name of a building or mast may include the word “tower,” but that does not affect its status.) This list also does not include the Petronius Platform, built in 2000 in the Gulf of Mexico, which is 610 m (2,001 ft) tall without its spire, or 640 m (2,100 ft) with it. While it is the world's tallest freestanding structure, 535 m (1,754 ft) of it is underwater and it is partly supported by buoyancy.
Sources: Structurae, Emporis, and other sources.

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