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Real or Make-Believe

Use a School Readiness Activity to provide early literacy thinking experiences for preschool children that will prepare them to do well in the early grades.
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Real or Make-Believe

Purpose/Skills
  • To comprehend and respond to books read aloud
  • To understand the difference between real facts and make-believe
  • To use expressive language
  • To recall and retell parts of a selection
  • To build vocabulary

Materials
See literature suggestion.

Literature Suggestion
Read I Took My Frog to the Library by Eric A. Kimmel and then a nonfiction book about frogs; or read two other books that contrast real and make-believe animals.

Vocabulary
real
make-believe

Warm-Up
Explain the differences between real and make-believe. Then play "What Do You Think?" Examples: Do you think that a rock can swim? Do you think that a fox can run? Do you think that a bunny can hop? Do you think that a banana can talk? Do you think that a frog can write a letter? Encourage children to call out: "Yes, that's real!" or "No, that's make-believe!"

Procedure

  • Display both books, talk about the covers, and leaf through the pages. Ask children to guess which book tells a make-believe story and which tells and shows real facts.
  • Read the make-believe story. Help children tell you how they know it is make-believe. Ask them to point out things in the story that could not really happen.
Enrichment
  • Read the nonfiction book to children.
  • Help children tell how they know it tells about real facts.
  • Discuss ways to tell the difference between books that tell make-believe stories and books that tell real facts.

Observation Assessment

  • Proficient - Child listens to the story attentively and makes observations that demonstrate an understanding that some books have stories that are make-believe and some books tell real facts.
  • In Process - Child listens and makes comments that show that the child knows that the story is make-believe, but is unable to describe differences without help.
  • Not Yet Ready - Child is not yet able to tell the difference between types of books.

Excerpted from

School Readiness Activity Cards
Pearson Early Childhood
Excerpted from School Readiness Activity Cards. The Preschool Activity Cards provide engaging and purposeful experiences that develop language, literacy, and math skills for preschool children.