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The Wolf's Chicken Stew by Keiko Kasza

Enhance reading abilities with an activity that enriches and expands children's language and emergent literacy skills.
Grades:
EL |
K
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Intro and techniques

The Wolf's Chicken Stew by Keiko Kasza

Summary of the Story

A wolf with a craving for chicken stew sees a chicken and is about to grab her when he decides that there would be more stew if the chicken were fatter. He makes pancakes, doughnuts, and cake, and leaves them at the chicken's front door. One night he peeks through the keyhole of her front door. Mrs. Chicken opens the door, and Mr. Wolf sees her and her many baby chicks. They thank him for all the wonderful treats. Mrs. Chicken fixes the wolf a nice dinner, and he goes home planning what he will make for the little chicks tomorrow.

Introducing the Story
  • Read the title of the book on the cover, while pointing to each word. Say the title together as you point to each word. Ask: Do you know what chicken stew is? (Stew is a hot dish made with chicken and vegetables.)

Reading the Story for the First Time

  • Read the words to the story on each page, moving your finger under the words as you read.
  • As you go through the book, ask the child to name each of the treats the wolf makes. Ask the child whether he or she has ever tasted any of the things the wolf makes. How do they taste?

Reading the Book Again and Again

  • Each time you read The Wolf's Chicken Stew, leave more of the "reading" or retelling to the child. Give open-ended prompts on each page. For example, ask: What is happening in this picture? What is he doing now?
  • Give prompts about objects or activities in the pictures. Use your finger to point to what you are asking about. Evaluate the child's response. Expand it by giving more information. Ask the child to repeat the answer. If he or she needs help in answering a question, ask that question again the next time you read the book. Good words to ask about are listed in the vocabulary section below. Be sure to talk about objects and actions the child brings up, too.
  • You may wish to discuss the prompts shown below.

Building Literacy

  • Talk with your child about his or her favorite foods. Name the foods you eat together.

Excerpted from

Read Together, Talk Together
Pearson Early Childhood

Excerpted from Read Together, Talk Together, the Pearson Early Childhood research-based program that makes reading aloud even more effective!

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