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Three Little Pigs: Retelling the Story

Use a School Readiness Activity to provide early language thinking experiences for preschool children that will prepare them to do well in the early grades.
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Three Little Pigs: Retelling the Story

Purpose/Skills
  • To listen to and retell a story
  • To respond to questions
  • To build vocabulary

Materials
Samples of straw, wood, brick (optional)

Vocabulary
book
story
pictures

Literature Suggestion
Read The Three Little Pigs by James Marshall, or another picture-book version of the tale with appealing illustrations.

Warm-Up

  • Tell the children you are going to read The Three Little Pigs.
  • Show them the cover and pictures from several exciting parts of the story.
  • Ask them to say what they think the story is about.
  • Children who are familiar with the story may also volunteer the details they recall.
  • For English Language Learners: introduce unfamiliar words, such as straw or brick.

Procedure

  • Read The Three Little Pigs.
  • Talk about what straw, wood, and bricks are like. If possible, show an example of each.
  • Go back to the beginning. Going through the book one page at a time, invite the children to retell the story by looking at the illustrations on the page. Prompt the children with questions to fill in important information about plot and character motivation. (Examples: Who was outside the house? Why did the pig run away? What happened next?)
  • Gently encourage quiet children to participate by asking them easy-to-answer questions, such as: Was the wolf being nice to the pigs? How do you know?

Enrichment
Invite the children to act out a favorite scene from the book. Encourage them to talk to each other about how to act it out.

Observation Assessment

  • Proficient - Child listens attentively to the story and uses increasingly complex and varied vocabulary to indicate understanding.
  • In Process - Child listens to the story, but struggles with increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.
  • Not Yet Ready- Child is inattentive and does not yet participate in discussion.

Excerpted from

School Readiness Activity Cards
Pearson Early Childhood
Excerpted from School Readiness Activity Cards. The Preschool Activity Cards provide engaging and purposeful experiences that develop language, literacy, and math skills for preschool children.