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Using Mad Libs® in the Classroom: Write Your Own Mad Libs® (Gr. 1-3)

Write Your Own activities focus on writing stories, letters, directions, and descriptive paragraphs and transforming them into Mad Libs selections.
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Using Mad Libs in the Classroom: Write Your Own (Gr. 1-3)

Write Your Own Mad Libs® (Gr. 1-3)

Use the Mad Libs® books to supplement your lower elementary teachings about writing with these activities for use with Mad Libs®. Use the Mad Libs® books in your classroom, or allow your students to enjoy Mad Libs® online!

Write Your Own Mad Libs® Printable
Use this printable to have students create their own Mad Libs® stories. Students supply key words (nouns, adjectives, and verbs) to a base paragraph to create an amusing story.

Make Your Own Mad Libs®
Invite children to write a story. Have them replace at least five nouns with a blank line and indicate the missing word is a noun. Then have partners exchange and complete each other's stories using words from a Mad Libs® word list. Encourage partners to read their completed stories to each other. Children can vary the game by replacing verbs or adjectives instead of nouns.

Mail Call
Use a Mad Libs® story to review parts of a friendly letter: heading, greeting, body, closing, and signature. Then have each child write a letter to a classmate. Children can select a name from a bag to determine whom they will write to. Have children place their letters in a designated box for distribution at "mail call."
Mystery Directions
Have children find and discuss examples of Mad Libs® stories that tell how to do something. Then challenge them to write their own simple "how to" stories. Encourage them to tell the topic, list materials, and describe the steps, but not to give the story a title. Have children exchange stories with a partner, read the partner's story, and title it.
Can You Picture That?
Invite children to write a short descriptive paragraph. Encourage them to use words from Mad Libs® word lists to describe how the subject looks, feels, sounds, tastes, or smells. Then pair children and have partners read aloud their paragraphs to each other. Challenge each child to draw a picture of the object based on his or her partner's description.

More Mad Libs®Teacher Guide's