ADVERTISEMENT |  REMOVE ADS

Six Principles of Effective Curriculum Design for Inclusive Classrooms

Special educators show how to design and deliver lessons that are truly inclusive

Developing lesson plans and curriculum for the inclusive classroom is a significant challenge for most generalists - this list of strategies, derived from the wisdom and experience of a team of special educators, gives an easy-to-implement overview of six curricular design strategies that ensure teachers are teaching inclusively.
Grades:
K |
1 |
2 |
3 |
4 |
5 |
6 |
7 |
8 |
9 |
10 |
11 |
CREATE NEW FOLDER
Cancel

Six Principles of Effective Curriculum Design for Inclusion

Big Ideas

Limit the number of new concepts introduced in a lesson, and focus first on the most basic concepts before advancing to the more complex concepts. Be sure that students understand one concept before introducing the second. For example, reserve teaching synonyms until students are firm on the basic concept. The concepts of comparatives and superlatives should be withheld until the basic concepts are clearly established. When introducing comparatives and superlatives, introduce comparatives first; then, after students consistently use comparatives, introduce superlatives.

More Inclusive Classroom Resources
Conspicuous Strategies

Use clear models to teach basic concepts. Use simple language.

Mediated Scaffolding

Limit the number of concepts introduced, and separate those that are likely to be confused. To reduce the language demands, refrain from introducing two new and unfamiliar labels in one day. It is also important to provide sufficient guided practice for the group before progressing to individual turns.

Strategic Integration

When the basic concepts are reliably known by learners, introduce comparative and superlative concepts strategically to build higher-order skills. Higher-order skills will not be useful or reliable if the basic concepts are not firm.

Judicious Review

To really "know" a concept students must use it frequently and in a variety of concepts. Lessons following the initial lesson should apply new concepts to build up the students' ability to remember and recall the concepts.

Primed Background Knowledge

A frequent limitation of early language programs is using language that learners may not understand. If the objective of the lesson is to introduce the concept big and little, then directions that tell children we will "compare" objects may not be meaningful. Examine the instructional language carefully to determine whether it will need to be simplified. It is also important to ensure that students have the prerequisite knowledge before using that knowledge in more complex contexts.

*Excerpted from Toward Successful Inclusion of Students with Disabilities: The Architecture of Instruction by Edward J. Kameenui, and Deborah Simmons (1999).

 

CEC
Provided in partnership with The Council for Exceptional Children.

Your Free Gift

The Ultimate Back-to-School Guide

Teachers are always thinking about their students, but devotion to their progress shouldn’t come at the expense of your own. That’s why we’ve created an “Ultimate Back-to-School Guide” for teachers based on our nine future-ready skill domains.

What you can expect from this guide:

  • Learn 9 ways to become a better teacher by developing a positive mindset.
  • Links to dozens of free resources curated by our experts to help you both in and outside the classroom.
  • Clear steps to improve your teaching and general well-being.

Sign up for a premium membership to get your Ultimate Back-to-School Guide absolutely free!

SIGN UP TO CLAIM YOUR FREE GIFT

ultimate back-to-school guide for teachers

Register