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Mar 3, 2015
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Slave Ships

In 1619, the first African captives arrived in the colony of Virginia. The evidence indicates that the very first Africans were regarded as indentured servants, but by the middle of the seventeenth century a tradition of lifelong labor for enslaved Africans had been firmly established, particularly in the South.

FAQs

What was indentured servitude? Those in indentured servitude were bound to labor for another person for a certain number of years to pay off a monetary debt or other obligation. When the obligation was repaid, the indentured servant was freed.

Snapshot: Life and Death on a Slave Ship

In 1972, salvager Mel Fisher and other treasure-hunters stumbled across the sunken wreckage of the Henrietta Marie, a slave ship that was lost to the ocean in 1700 after having just delivered perhaps 300 African men to lives of slavery in the Americas.

In the years since the discovery of the Henrietta Marie, treasure seekers and scientists have been retrieving artifacts from the wreckage (See “Last Voyage of the Slave Ship Henrietta Marie,” Jennifer Steinberg, National Geographic magazine, August 2002). Their discoveries have painted a chilling picture of the immense and hellish human toll of the global slave trade. The ship is the oldest slave-trading vessel ever recovered, and one of very few to be located in U.S. waters.

Here are some of the conclusions we can now draw about the Henrietta Marie (and the many ships like her).

Sold to New Captors

Scholars believe that many of the slaves who were transported to North America and Europe in ships like the Henrietta Marie met their fate because they had fallen prisoners to rival tribes in Africa. Their enemies sold them to slave traders for such European goods as beads, spoons, and iron bars.

Keeping the Cargo Fed

The Africans on board the Henrietta Marie were fed two meals each day. A massive copper cooking cauldron was raised from the sea in 1972; it was apparently used to prepare boiled yams and beans.

A Long and Deadly Journey

Captives spent roughly three months at sea making the journey from West Africa to Jamaica. As a slaver, the Henrietta Marie completed two such trips and delivered 450 Africans to captivity in the New World.

Their wrists held in place by iron shackles, the captives were herded into crowded holds like beasts. The conditions were unspeakable, and it is not surprising that an estimated 20 percent of the prisoners perished on the journey.

African men and women who died en route were tossed overboard for sharks to devour.

Excerpted from The Complete Idiot's Guide to African-American History © 2003 by Melba J. Duncan. All rights reserved including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form. Used by arrangement with Alpha Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) Inc.

To order this book visit the Idiot's Guide web site or call 1-800-253-6476.

Highlights

Galactic Hot Dogs Reading Marathon
Join the Galactic Hot Dogs Reading Marathon! Read each episode as it's re-released with newly revealed facts, behind-the-scenes illustrations, and the inside scoop. Make it official by pledging on the blog to read each chapter with Cosmoe. Your students will love following the exploits of these space travelers, and you'll love the educational elements that can easily be paired to the stories.

Handwashing Awareness
Kids are especially susceptible to contracting and spreading viruses during the winter months. Prevention starts with proper handwashing. Show students how to keep germs away.

March Calendar of Events
March is full events that you can incorporate into your standard curriculum. Our Educators' Calendar outlines activities for each event, including: National School Breakfast Week (3/2-6), World Orphan Week (3/4-11), Boston Massacre (3/5/1770), Daylight Saving Time Begins (3/8), International Women's Day (3/8), Teen Tech Week (3/8-14), Pi Day (3/14), St. Patrick's Day (3/17), Spring Begins (3/20), Make Your Own Holiday Day (3/26), and World Theatre Day (3/27). Plus, celebrate Deaf History Month (3/15-4/15), Music In Our Schools Month, Women's History Month, and Youth Art Month!

Poptropica Teaching Guides
Poptropica is one of the Internet's most popular sites for kids—and now it's available as an app for the iPad! It's not just a place to play games; each of the islands featured on the site provides a learning opportunity. Check out our teaching guides to four of Poptropica's islands: 24 Carrot Island, Time Tangled Island, Mystery Train Island, and Mythology Island.

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Women's History Month
March is Women's History Month. Talk to your students about the accomplishments women have made—as well as the adversity they have faced.

Teaching with Comics
Reach reluctant readers and English-language learners with comics! Our original teaching guide to the Galactic Hot Dogs comic series, as found on Funbrain.com, will take students on a cosmic adventure while engaging their creative minds. Plus, find even more activities for teaching with comics, featuring many other classic stores.


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