The Crossover Profile

The following is a composite of the crossover child. Recognizing that no one child will fit the complete list, the composite consists of both gifted and learning disabled characteristics:

Like other gifted children, the typical crossover child:
  • Intellectually approaches or reaches the gifted range (120-130+ verbal comprehension and/or perceptual organization using Wechsler scores).
  • Has more interest and ability in pursuing broadbased, thematic topics than in remembering and dealing with details.
  • Is somewhat more of an intuitive dreamer than a practically oriented thinker.
  • Exhibits a sophisticated sense of humor.
  • Visualizes well and does well in areas requiring this ability such as:
    • math
    • geometry
    • art
  • Is highly sensitive and bases decisions on personal feeling and human need rather than on logic.
  • Has a high "readiness to learn" and a great interest in learning when topics are presented in a challenging manner.
Like children of average ability with learning disabilities, the typical crossover child:
  • Has an uneven intellectual pattern on the Wechsler intelligence tests with verbal comprehension and/or perceptual organization.
  • Has an uneven academic pattern with strengths most likely in mathematics or content areas and weaknesses in the language arts areas.
  • Has written language difficulties including:
    • poor handwriting
    • poor mechanics
    • difficulty in organizing content
  • Needs remediation for skills deficits.
  • Is distractible in large groups and has difficulty in completing work because of that distractibility.
  • Has difficulty in organizing time and materials often resulting in:
    • forgotten homework
    • incomplete homework
    • the need for excessive completion time
  • Needs medical monitoring because he or she may benefit from medication and/or behavioral intervention for ADHD.
  • Needs more time to process language and respond than would be expected of someone with high intellectual capabilities.
  • Lacks some social skills and common sense decision-making ability.
  • Sometimes exhibits visual or auditory perceptual deficits or unusual visual sensitivity to light.
  • Is less successful when confronted with input from multiple sources or with tasks that require the integration of multiple skills.

Council for Exceptional Children

Provided in partnership with The Council for Exceptional Children.


If you need to teach it, we have it covered.

Start your free trial to gain instant access to thousands of expertly curated worksheets, activities, and lessons created by educational publishers and teachers.

Start Your Free Trial

Follow us on:

Follow TeacherVision on Facebook
Follow TeacherVision on Google Plus

Highlights

December Calendar of Events
December is full of events that you can incorporate into your standard curriculum! Our Educators' Calendar outlines activities for each event. Happy holidays!

Bullying Prevention Resources
Bullying can cause both physical and emotional harm. Put a stop to classroom bullying, with our bullying prevention resources. Learn how to recognize several forms of bullying and teasing, and discover effective techniques for dealing with and preventing bullying in school.

Conflict Resolution
Teach your students to how resolve conflict amongst themselves without resorting to name-calling, fights, and tattling.

Immigration Resources
Studying immigration brings to light the many interesting and diverse cultures in the world.