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Eclipses of the Sun and Moon, 2005 - 2015

An article listing the dates and places of eclipses occurring between 2005 and 2015.
Grades:
3 |
4 |
5 |
6 |
7 |
8 |
9 |
10 |
11 |
Themes:
Space (472)

Holidays:

Note: The day of an eclipse is given in Universal Time (U.T.) and may start a day earlier or later depending on your time zone.

2015

  • 20 March. Total eclipse of the Sun. Partially visible from Greenland, Iceland, Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East, and northwestern Asia.
  • 4 April. Total eclipse of the Moon. Visible from Australia, New Zealand, eastern Asia, Indonesia, and the Pacific coast of North America.
  • 13 September. Partial eclipse of the Sun. Visible from South Africa and Antarctica.
  • 28 September. Total eclipse of the Moon. Visible from North America, South America, Europe, western Asia, and western parts of Africa.

2014

  • 15 April. Total eclipse of the Moon. Visible from North and South America.
  • 29 April. Annular eclipse of the Sun. Visible from Australia, the southern Indian Ocean, and Indonesia.
  • 8 October. Total eclipse of the Moon. Visible from the Pacific Ocean, New Zealand, eastern Australia, Japan, and eastern Asia.
  • 23 October. Partial eclipse of the Sun. Visible from Canada, the eastern United States, and Mexico.

2013

  • 25 April. Partial eclipse of the Moon. Visible from eastern Europe, Africa, central Asia, and western Australia.
  • 10 May. Annular eclipse of the Sun. Fully visible from Australia, eastern Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and the Gilbert Islands. Partially visible from Australia, Indonesia, Oceania and the Pacific Ocean.
  • 25 May. Penumbral eclipse of the Moon. Visible from North America, South America, and western Africa.
  • 18 October. Penumbral eclipse of the Moon. Visible from North America, Europe, and Africa.
  • 3 November. Hybrid eclipse of the Sun. Fully visible from parts of the North Atlantic and equatorial Africa. Partially visible from eastern North America, northern South America, southern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

2012

  • 20-21 May. Annular eclipse of the Sun. Visible from North America, the Pacific and East Asia.
  • 4 June. Partial eclipse of the Moon Visible from western Canada, the United States, the Pacific, and eastern Australia.
  • 13-14 November. Total eclipse of the Sun. Visible from the South Pacific (including Australia and New Zealand), southern South America, and part of Antarctica.
  • 28 November. Penumbral eclipse of the Moon. Visible from western Canada, the United States, Australia, and East Asia.

2011

  • 4 January. Partial eclipse of the Sun. Visible from much of Europe, North Africa and central Asia.
  • 1 June. Partial eclipse of the Sun. Visible from the upper Northern Hemisphere, including Siberia and northern China.
  • 15 June. Total eclipse of the Moon. Fully visible from the eastern half of Africa, the Middle East, central Asia, western Australia, and South America. Partially visible from Europe, Eastern Asia, eastern Australia, and New Zealand.
  • 1 July. Partial eclipse of the Sun. Visible from the Antarctic Ocean.
  • 25 November. Partial eclipse of the Sun. Visible from southern South Africa, Antarctica, Tasmania and most of New Zealand.
  • 10 December. Total eclipse of the Moon. Fully visible from Asia and Australia. Partially visible from North American, Europe, and Africa.

2010

  • 15 Jan. Annular eclipse of the Moon. Visible primarily from Africa, Asia and Indonesia.
  • 26 June. Partial eclipse of the Moon. Visible from much of the Americas, the Pacific and eastern Asia.
  • 11 July. Total eclipse of the Sun. Visible from South Pacific and southern South America.
  • 21 Dec. Total eclipse of the Moon. Visible from North America and western South America.

2009

  • 26 Jan. Annular eclipse of the Sun. Visible from a wide track that traverses the southern Atlantic Ocean, missing the African continent by 560 miles, curving over the southern Indian Ocean, reaching land with the Cocos Islands, southern Sumatra, and western Java.
  • 9 Feb. Penumbral eclipse of the Moon. Visible from Alaska, Hawaii, Australia, and East Asia.
  • 22 July. Total eclipse of the Sun. Visible from across India, China, southern Japan, and the south Pacific Ocean.
  • 31 Dec. Partial eclipse of the Moon. Primarily visible from the Eastern Hemisphere.

2008

  • Feb. 7. Annular eclipse of the Sun. Visible from a wide track that traverses Antarctica and Southern regions of the Pacific Ocean. A partial eclipse will be seen from the southeastern third of Australia, all of New Zealand, and most of Antarctica.
  • Feb. 21. Total eclipse of the Moon. Visible in most of North and South America as well as western Europe.
  • Aug. 01. Total eclipse of the Sun. Visible from Canada across to the northern Greenland, the Arctic, central Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial eclipse can be seen from northeastern North America and most of Europe and Asia.
  • Aug. 16. Partial eclipse of the Moon. Visible from the Eastern Hemisphere as well as eastern South America.

2007

  • March 3–4. Total eclipse of the Moon. Visible in the Arctic, Asia except the easter part, Europe including the British Isles, Africa, South America, and the eastern parts of central and North America.
  • March 19. Partial eclipse of the Sun. Visible in most of Alaska, eastern and central Asia except the central parts of Japan and the western part of Russia.
  • Aug. 28. Total eclipse of the Moon. Visible in the Americas except the eastern part of South America and the northeastern parts of North America, the Pacific Ocean, eastern parts of Asia, Australasia, and Antarctica.
  • Sept. 11. Partial eclipse of the Sun. Visible in parts of Antarctica, South America except the northern part, and the southwestern Atlantic Ocean.

2006

  • March 15. Penumbral eclipse of the Moon.
  • March 29. Total eclipse of the Sun. Visible in Brazil, Ghana, Togo, Benin, Nigeria, Niger, northwest Chad, Libya, the northwest tip of Egypt, Turkey, northwest Georgia, southwest Russia, Kazakstan, the southern tip of Russia, and ends in the northern tip of Mongolia.
  • Sept. 7. Partial eclipse of the Moon. Visible from parts of Antarctica, Australasia, Asia, Africa, and Europe including the British Isles.
  • Sept. 22. Annular eclipse of the Sun. Visible in Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, the South Atlantic Ocean, and ends southwest of the Kerguelen Islands

2005

  • Apr. 8. Annular-total eclipse of the Sun. Visible in New Zealand, part of Antarctica, southern United States, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America except eastern and southern parts.
  • Apr. 24. Penumbral eclipse of the Moon. The beginning of the penumbral phase visible in North America, Central America, South America, New Zealand, eastern Australia, eastern Indonesia, most of Antarctica, the North Pacific Ocean except the extreme western part, the South Pacific Ocean, the Bering Sea, the western Atlantic Ocean; the end visible in western North America, most of Mexico, the extreme southern tip of South America, Indonesia, eastern Asia, New Zealand, Australia, Antarctica except coastal Queen Maud Land, the Pacific Ocean, and the eastern Indian Ocean.
  • Oct. 3. Annular eclipse of the Sun. Visible in eastern Greenland, Iceland, Europe (including the British Isles), Africa except southern tip, western Asia including India.
  • Oct. 17. Partial eclipse of the Moon. The beginning of the umbral phase visible in central and western North America, northern Central America, northern Greenland, the Arctic region, eastern Asia, Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Wilkes Land and coastal Marie Byrd Land of Antarctica, the North Pacific Ocean, the South Pacific Ocean except eastern part, and the eastern Indian Ocean; the end visible in western North America, northern Greenland, the Arctic region, Asia except the extreme western part, Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, part of Wilkes Land in Antarctica, the North Pacific Ocean, the South Pacific Ocean except eastern part, and the eastern Indian Ocean.

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