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Man Booker Prize Winners (1997-2014)

The Man Booker Prize honors the best work of fiction written in English by a citizen of a current or former British Commonwealth country. In 2014, American authors became eligible for the prize. Considered Britain's most prestigious literary prize, the Booker is presented each October or November by the National Book League in the United Kingdom. In 2002, the purse increased from $30,000 to $75,000.
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The God of Small Things (1997) 
By Arundhati Roy
The God of Small Things (1997)
By Arundhati Roy
In this semi-autobiographical story set in India, fraternal twins Rahel and Estha become victims of circumstance. Roy portrays family tragedy and drama, cultural expectations and restrictions, and politics through the unguarded, innocent observation of children.

Fun Fact: The title The God of Small Things refers to the character Velutha, a family handyman.

Amsterdam (1998) 
By Ian McEwan
Amsterdam (1998)
By Ian McEwan
Amsterdam, a tale of morality in contemporary Britain, centers on two successful men, Vernon Halliday, a newspaper editor, and Clive Linley, a composer. Both men had loved the same woman, Molly Lane, who died of a degenerative illness. After attending her funeral, the two men make a pact to euthanize the other if he ever suffers from such a disease. However, the pact falls apart when the two men become enemies and seek revenge on each other.

Fun Fact: In the novel, Amsterdam is where Clive must premiere his composition commissioned by the Millennium Symphony.

Disgrace (1999)  
By J. M. Coetzee
Disgrace (1999)
By J. M. Coetzee
Coetzee fluidly depicts the social and political turmoil of his homeland, contemporary South Africa. Disgrace features a twice-married, twice-divorced 52-year-old professor, David Lurie, who tries to flee personal and professional shame. Lurie leaves his life behind to live on his daughter's farm, only to find brutality, heartbreak, and further disgrace.

Fun Fact: J.M. Coetzee also won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2003.

The Blind Assassin (2000)  
By Margaret Atwood
The Blind Assassin (2000)
By Margaret Atwood
Set in Canada amid a century of history, including the Depression and World War II, The Blind Assassin reveals the intricacies of family and sibling rivalry, and the complexities of the individual mind. Atwood writes about Iris Chase Griffen and her personal tragedies, illuminating human promise, betrayal, sexual obsession, and love in a time of social unrest.

Fun Fact: Margaret Atwood became internationally famous after the success of her 1984 novel, The Handmaid's Tale.

True History of the Kelly Gang (2001) 
By Peter Carey
True History of the Kelly Gang (2001)
By Peter Carey
Despite its title, True History of the Kelly Gang, Carey's novel is a fictional account of the life of Ned Kelly – a famous criminal who lived in Australia during the late 19th century. Kelly was a legendary man who eluded the corrupt police force in Australia; Carey likens Ned Kelly to a modern-day Robin Hood. The novel is narrated through a series of letters that Kelly writes to a daughter he will never see, explaining the saga of his life and his family's life in colonial Australia.

Fun Fact: Ned Kelly's father, John "Red" Kelly, was an Irishman who was transported to Australia, eventually settling in the Victoria.

Life of Pi (2002)  
By Yann Martel
Life of Pi (2002)
By Yann Martel
Yann Martel weaves an imaginative tale of faith in his adventurous novel, Life of Pi. The main character, Pi Patel, is the 16-year-old son of a zookeeper in India. The family packs up its menagerie and sets out for Canada, but is shipwrecked during their journey across the Pacific. Drifting for 227 days on a life raft, Pi faces the elements, battling his own hunger and imagination to survive.

Fun Fact: Yann Martel is a Canadian author, born in Spain, who was inspired to write Life of Pi during a trip to India.

Vernon God Little (2003) 
By DBC Pierre
Vernon God Little (2003)
By DBC Pierre
DBC Pierre's Vernon God Little is a dark comedy set in Texas during the aftermath of a local school shooting. The first-person novel is narrated by 15-year-old Vernon Little, who has been accused of being an accessory in the school shootings. Despite his innocence, Little flees his town, fearing the media and a possible death sentence. Vernon God Little is a satirical portrayal of American society and a 15-year-old's struggle to understand life.

Fun Fact: DBC Pierre is the pen name of an Australian writer named Peter Finlay, who lived much of his life in Mexico and Texas.

The Line of Beauty (2004)  
By Alan Hollinghurst
The Line of Beauty (2004)
By Alan Hollinghurst
Nick Guest, a young outsider, moves in with the family of a wealthy friend and becomes involved in the sophisticated gay culture of 1980s London. He struggles to gain acceptance with the social elite, and is conflicted about the importance of money, sex, and class. Writing in elegant, seductive, and dreamlike prose, Hollinghurst sets the novel in an atmosphere of dark opulence and passion.

Fun Fact: The Line of Beauty was made into a BBC television drama series and a feature film in 2006.

The Sea (2005) 
By John Banville
The Sea (2005)
By John Banville
In The Sea, John Banville paints a portrait of Max Morden, a man who is at a crossroad in life, mourning the loss of his wife. Reminiscing about his past, Morden returns to the seaside town where he spent a memorable summer during his youth. His memory centers on the Grace family, whom he met in that seaside town, the relationship he formed with them, and the traumatic history they shared.

Fun Fact: The Sea is the 14th novel written by John Banville.

The Inheritance of Loss (2006)  
By Kiran Desai
The Inheritance of Loss (2006)
By Kiran Desai
Political and familial tensions course through The Inheritance of Loss, set in the Himalayan foothills during the 1980s, when the Nepalese movement for an independent state was about to erupt. Desai portrays poverty, love, class, modernization, and cultural identity through the lives, struggles, and romances of the characters: Jemubhai, a Cambridge-educated judge, and his orphaned 17-year-old granddaughter, Sai.

Fun Fact: The daughter of novelist Anita Desai (author of 1984's In Custody), Kiran Desai grew up in India, England, and the United States.

The Gathering (2007) 
By Anne Enright
The Gathering (2007)
By Anne Enright
In The Gathering, Enright tells the story of a large Irish family that reunites for the funeral of their rebellious brother. Her richly detailed prose combines honesty and subtle humor to portray enthralling stories of complicated family relationships, cultural and religious repression, and emotional turmoil in contemporary Ireland.

Fun Fact: The main character in The Gathering, Veronica Hegerty, is one of 12 children.

The White Tiger (2008)
By Aravind Adiga
The White Tiger (2008)
By Aravind Adiga

The White Tiger tells the tale of two Indias as it takes the reader on Balram's journey from the darkness of village life to the light of entrepreneurial success. Themes include: corruption, religious tensions, loyalty, and globalization.

Fun Fact: The The White Tiger was Aravind Adiga's debut novel.

Source:http://www.themanbookerprize.com
Wolf Hall (2009) 
By Hilary Mantel
Wolf Hall (2009)
By Hilary Mantel

In the historical novel Wolf Hall, Mantel tells the story of Thomas Cromwell's rise to power in the court of England's King Henry VIII.

Fun Fact: Hilary Mantel spent five years researching and writing Wolf Hall.

The Finkler Question (2010) 
By Howard Jacobson
The Finkler Question (2010)
By Howard Jacobson

In The Finkler Question, Jacobson tells the story of three friends–two recently widowed Jewish men and one unmarried Gentile. After reuniting for an evening of reminiscing, one of the men is attacked on his way home and his whole sense of who and what he is slowly and ineluctably changes. The Finkler Question is a scorching story of friendship and loss, exclusion and belonging, and of the wisdom and humanity of maturity.

Fun Fact: The Finkler Question is a comic novel.

Source:http://www.themanbookerprize.com
The Sense of an Ending (2011) 
By Julian Barnes
The Sense of an Ending (2011)
By Julian Barnes

In The Sense of an Ending, Barnes tells a tragic story about childhood friendship, suicide, and the imperfections of memory. As schoolboys, Tony Webster and Adrian Finn's friendship is strained by a female relationship and later severed by suicide. When Tony receives an unexpected bequest in his early sixties, he is driven to seek out the truth about the past and reassess long-held assumptions.

Fun Fact: Barnes was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 1984, 1998, and 2005.

Source:http://www.themanbookerprize.com
Bring Up the Bodies (2012) 
By Hilary Mantel
Bring Up the Bodies (2012)
By Hilary Mantel

In Bring Up the Bodies, Mantel continues the story of the rise and fall of Thomas Cromwell in the court of England's King Henry VIII during 1535 and 1536. This sequel to Wolf Hall is the second historical novel in a planned trilogy.

Fun Fact: Hilary Mantel is the third author to win the Man Booker Prize twice and the first to win with a sequel.

Source:http://www.themanbookerprize.com
The Luminaries (2013)
The Luminaries (2013)

The Luminaries is a murder mystery set during the New Zealand gold rush of the 1860s. This Victorian epic is Eleanor Catton's second novel.

Fun Facts: At age 28, Eleanor Catton is the youngest author to win the Man Booker Prize. At over 800 pages, The Luminaries is the longest work to win the Man Booker Prize.

Source:http://www.themanbookerprize.com
The Narrow Road to the Deep North (2014)
The Narrow Road to the Deep North (2014)

The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan is a love story unfolding over half a century between a doctor and his uncle's wife. The novel is set during the construction of the Thailand-Burma Death Railway in World War II.

Fun Facts: The novel takes its title from Oku no Hosomichi, one of the most famous books in classical Japanese literature, written by 17th-century haiku poet Basho.

Source:http://www.themanbookerprize.com
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